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Welcome to FRST 318/537: Forest and Conservation Economics

PLEASE NOTE THAT FRST 318 WILL BE USING CONNECT FOR 2016. THE UPDATED SYLLABUS IS PROVIDED HERE BUT ALL READINGS AND COURSE MATERIAL WILL BE AVAILABLE ON CONNECT.

Instructor: Harry Nelson
harry.nelson@ubc.ca
(604) 827-3478
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Office Hours: by appointment

 

FRST 318 TA: Angela Mawdsley
angela.lockrey@forestry.ubc.ca
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Office Hours: Wednesday 2 – 3pm

 

Lectures: Tuesday and Thursday 8:30 am – 9:30 am in Hugh Dempster Pavilion (DMP) room 310

Labs: There are three lab sections running Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

            Lab 01:     Wednesdays 3-5                FSC 1003(computer lab 1404)
            Lab 02:     Fridays 10-noon               FSC 1003 (computer lab 1406)
            Lab 03:     Mondays 3-5                     FSC 1406

Weekly lab sessions involve working on either problem sets or the group project. The sessions are also a good time for students to ask the teaching assistant about the subject matter taught in the lectures.

 

BROAD LEARNING OUTCOMES

Once you complete the course you will be able to:

  • Explain the benefits human society derives from forests, how to value the goods and services forests provide;
  • Show the role of markets in providing various goods and services, including land, and the limitations of markets and potential solutions;
  • Apply the course concepts and methods to academic articles, news stories and reports;
  • Reflect upon your own values and assumptions; and
  • Develop collaborative and interdisciplinary communication and thinking skills

I also encourage you to think about how you can engage as informed citizens on our stewardship of our forests and the environment and contribute to promoting greater awareness of issues and towards solutions.

 

COURSE THEMES

While we focus strongly on the application to forest-based goods and services, we will also draw on a number of concepts and tools that can be applied more broadly to environmental issues beyond just forestry.

This course is a lecture course with weekly labs. The lecture is used to introduce concepts and ideas; these are then applied through solving problem sets in the labs and the group exercises.

 

TEXT

Zhang, Daowei and Peter Pearse. 2011. Forest Economics. UBC Press.

Other Readings

[EE] Stavins, Economics of the Environment

Jaeger, Environmental Economics for Tree Huggers and Other Skeptics.

 

COURSE EVALUATION

There will be a total of four problem sets, two case studies, six quizzes and one group project. Problem sets will be due at the end of the lab and weighted equally. One of the problem sets is a group activity. The case studies will be available on-line a week before the lab and will be worth 7.5% each. The quizzes will be uploaded on Thursday and available until Friday, midnight. Exact dates are in the schedule. There are six and the five highest marks will be taken and will be weighted equally.

The Group Project consists of a class presentation given in lab and a brief report due the last day of class, April 8 (see the end of the syllabus for details).

Quizzes (10%)

Problem Sets (10%)

Case Studies (15%)

Group Project (15%)

Mid-Term Exam (20%)

Final Exam (30%)